Thursday, February 14, 2013

The Gingers in The Jungle

Yesterday we featured our visit to the Bromeliad Collection at the Singapore Botanic Gardens but prior to that we first visited the Ginger Garden which is another one of their dedicated areas and this one concentrates on plants from the order Zingiberales. It features plants from the genus Alpinia, Hedychium, Costus, Etlingera, Curcuma, Zingiber, Canna, Heliconia, Strelitzia, Musa, and perhaps many more, including other plants that are not gingers per se but associate well with them.



There weren't many that were in bloom when we visited, just a few to give a shot of colour here and there rather than a riot of it but what struck me the most is how this garden was presented; the pathways, the plants, hard landscaping, and seating areas. Forget the blooms, what I loved the most about this area is that it is a stunning jungle garden. After all, nearly all gingers make fabulous foliage plants. Mass them together, combined with towering palms, mature trees, and leafy epiphytes here and there; and gloss them all with a tropical rain shower and the scene is complete, and even perfect. Come and explore the ginger jungle garden with us....
The pathway that leads to the Ginger Garden, with towering trees indicating the botanic gardens' maturity
The first of this areas several benches in strategic places. Just look at the planting behind and surrounding it, gorgeous!
This waterfall enhances and reinforces the atmosphere of a lush, tropical paradise
The winding pathways that invites you to explore
Lush tropicana
Did I say several benches?
Had if it wasn't wet we would have taken a seat here and took in the lush views for quite some time
The maturity of this garden is undeniable

Get yourself lost along the pathways


Another bench...
And another. Perhaps you can never have too many in this gorgeous location



A great way to use an old tree stump
Some pathways are narrow and you'll have to fight your way in amongst the towering and lush foliage

Not to forget it is a ginger garden after all, here's one of their many specimens from the genus Costus (Spiral Ginger)
The atmosphere of this are is amazing and unforgettable. Lush, jungle, paradise - three words that keep popping in our minds whenever we think back about this place.

Mark :-)

32 comments :

  1. Mark, this is truly an exceptional garden! Thank you very much for the tour, I enjoyed it a lot. As you stated yourself repeatedly I feel part of the magic of this garden is due to the fact that it is a really mature garden. I didn't miss flowers at all in this place, the lush, green was so soothing and pleasing to the eye that it didn't need any "flower enhancement". The Spiral Ginger is quite something. I have never seen a ginger like that. Mother nature always comes up with surprises!
    Christina

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    1. Thanks Christina, its a pleasure! I wonder if some spiral gingers would do well in your area? It's possible so worth sourcing some out there and trying out :) it is a magical garden, even without many flowers the foliage and planting alone makes it worthwhile.

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  2. Wow...I could feel the warm rain on my face as I "walked" through the garden with you guys. Do you know how old the garden is?

    (happy valentine's day!)

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    1. It did look very steamy and humid from the photos Loree! Luckily it wasn't the case, it felt fresh after the rains. I know the botanic gardens itself is over a century old but not sure about the area where the ginger garden is. Some of the towering trees and palms may be several decades old but its possible the ginger garden itself was only done as recent as late 80s :)

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  3. Replies
    1. Stay an extra day or two on your next stopover here Clive :)

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  4. Very cool also. I really like the hardscape here but the plants are beautiful too.
    Cher Sunray Gardens

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  5. You lucky guys - ginger? bromeliads? even better than snowdrops and sleet.......jsut

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  6. Ginger...ginger..I am trying my best to grow them here in NJ, but I think they are simply refusing!! Darn! You are in Singapore? Have lots of fun :-).

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    1. Keep trying KL, never give up yet, you might eventually crack it :)

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  7. You guys are lucky to be having this nice break from winter! Such a beautiful garden! Thanks for taking us along!

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    1. Only a little break but back to chilly UK soon :)

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  8. What a great holiday. Pity you've had so much rain but in the tropics even the rain is warm. Enjoy the rest of your break.

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    1. It was indeed Missy, very memorable. The rain wasn't too bad, there were plenty of dry intervals too and it was warm so wasn't that uncomfortable :)

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  9. Thought of you guys last night as I was reading an article in the February edition of 'The English Garden' about a garden in Bangkok. It sounds as if you are having an amazing time - thanks for the tour. What a shame about the rain but at least it was warm rain :)

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    1. Thanks Anna! Indeed at least it was warm rain and there were plenty of dry intervals too. The experience was truly lovely :)

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  10. It is all pretty staggering. What charmed me specially (as opposed to awe-struck me!) was the way they'd painted plants on the wall to show what they'll look like when they grow. What an excellent idea!

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  11. What an amazing place. Such wonderful contrasting textures. You guys must had been in heaven - and taking a lot of notes and photos!!

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    1. Loads of photos indeed Janet, it'll take us awhile to sort all of them but good fun though! :)

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  12. Hi Mark and Gaz, that garden is really outstanding, am sure its maintenance is very high too. Very obviously it is a manmade garden but yes already very mature. They have a wetter climate than ours, so i guess healthier looking foliage. That Costus is growing like weeds in our property though. If only i have funds i want to make our property a nature garden too, ours is not flat so lovely to develop with unusual character.

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    1. The coastal location of Singapore makes their climate much wetter than the Philippines it seems, more pronounced at least. They also use Costus for street planting which was nice to see :)

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  13. Wonderful pics again - I love the red totem pole/sculpture amongst all the green and the spiral ginger is a favorite of mine too!

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    1. Thanks Ian, we do like that totem pole too!

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  14. I always knew ginger looked good, those pathways just invite you to walk forever, fortunately with plenty resting places. Scotland is also famous for gingers, but only recently I heard that they are getting fewer and fewer.

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    1. Lol!! Those pathways were inviting indeed. Makes you want to explore further....:)

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  15. Wow! What a lush and lovely garden, complete with waterfall, my dream. The colorful art pieces (Totems? Not sure what to call them!) add a refreshing color contrast.

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    1. They do don't they? :) I think they are totems, never really did check what they were actually called but should be safe enough to call them totem poles.

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  16. This looks like a lovely place to taker a leisurely stroll! Love it! Jeannine

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