Friday, December 21, 2012

Deserts and Arid, History of Plants - Jardin des Plantes

Jardin des Plantes
Here's the second in the series of blog posts regarding the glasshouses at Jardin des Plantes in Paris.

The biggest section of the glasshouses are the plants from the humid tropics and the remaining three sections are much smaller yet still packed with several interesting plants. The arid section is on the same glasshouse as where the humid tropical section is but it along a narrow section that connects the front to back parts of the structure.

It is more like a Desert and Arid corridor...


Jardin des Plantes
A skinny Desert and Arid section with a modest selection of xerophytes
Mixed arid plants with overly prominent tags.



Agave filifera
Agave filifera (is it about to flower??)
Agave desmettiana
Agave desmettiana
Agave parrasana
Agave parrasana
That's a bit better!

We loved the form of this Opuntia microdasys
A wide selection of barrel cactus, again the display could have been more engaging to the visitor.
Sulcorebutia steinbachii var. gracilior
Sulcorebutia steinbachii var. gracilior - tongue twister of a name but I really like this one!
Agave tequilana
Agave tequilana (?)
We whizzed through this section and just took photos as we passed by, not just because it was comparatively small but also it still lacked the impact of planting as what you'd normally expect in glasshouse specimens. Perhaps this section is newly planted and the plants haven't grown or settled in yet? Newly planted or not they could do with more plants in this area or re-think the planting altogether for more impact.

After passing by this 'dry and white' corridor you go back into the humid tropical section where there is a passageway to get to the New Caledonia section (more of this on the third and final instalment). The last part, which was oddly not connected by glass walkway and is separate from the rest is the History of Plants (Evolution) glasshouse. Small selections of lichens, horsetails, ferns, conifers, and cycads are to be found there, arranged in a way to demonstrate their timeline of appearance on the face of the earth. This section is interesting enough for a ten minute amble. Curiously, this part has a security guard...


The primitive genus that is Equisetum
...and the delicate and fern-like beauty of Selaginella, the spikemosses

Blechnum brasiliense
Fossilised tree trunk
Ginkgo biloba leaves
It may be winter outside but it's only autumn inside the glasshouse - Ginkgo biloba leaves


Encephalartos lehmannii
Encephalartos lehmannii
A large Podocarpus salignus at the back
A large Podocarpus salignus at the back


Cyathea robusta
Cyathea robusta
Equisetum
More Equisetum (I wonder if this was deliberate or just spread around...)
Quite a contrast of a post, from dry to moist and lush! On the next and final instalment will be a short yet very interesting glimpse of the plants from New Caledonia.

Mark :-)

32 comments :

  1. Overly prominent tags indeed! I am really looking forward to the next installment, though - New Caledonia is not a place I know anything about.

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    1. New Caledonia still seems a pretty obscure place that we seldom hear of. That section had several plants we've never seen before as we'll.

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  2. I'm afraid I have to say the arid corridor looked much the same in 1997-98 when I lived in Paris as it did when I visited last year... I just don't think they are all that interested in this section compared to the humid glass house.

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    1. Looks like it then Soren, if it looked virtually the same all this time. Some of the plants looked like it needs a bit more care.

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  3. What a wonderful collection of plants here! I'd like to with both of you Mark and Gaz, Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays!

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    1. Merry Christmas to you too Autumn Belle!

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  4. Wow that desert alley leaves a lot to be desired, and I'm glad you mentioned the labeling. It's one thing to be educational but that had the look of a scientific collection not a planting. I do love the cycads though...

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    1. I should have posted the photo of their Agave attenuata, you would either laugh or feel sorry for it (or both).

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  5. I know I should be looking at the plants but I'd love to see more of the structures too. I'm looking forward to reading more from you both in the new year - I hope you have a lot more exciting trips planned. All the best.

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    1. Thank you :) and looking forward to the new year already!

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  6. Steinbachii pyramid is my favourite - bet it had an enormous name-tag.

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  7. Very neat plants. Several here I like a lot.
    Cher Sunray Gardens

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  8. Hope you both have a very merry Christmas.

    Sounds like the curator / gardener there likes lush and humid plants. Can't say I blame him.

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    1. Thank you Missy, and you too! I think the preference for lush plants by the 'curator' is obvious....

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  9. I have discovered I cant go into arid greenhouses as they make me asthmatic!! Had a terrible turn in the tiny arid glasshouse at Oxford so I suppose its lucky I'm not that keen on cactus. I do like the plants in the bottom photos though

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    1. Oh no! I wonder which part of cacti or other succulents you may be allergic with? You may be fine with Agaves and Aloes, I know Aeoniums you are ok as grow these already. I like Oxford BG, their plant collections are probably better than what can be found in this BG

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  10. Still some cool plants in the desert corridor but, as others have said, this display is not as impressive as the others at this B.G. Merry Christmas Mark and Gaz!

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  11. You always feature such interesting gardens and plants! I confess I am not a cacti lover. They are interesting to look at, but I am a very tactile person and like to touch my plants. Can't pet a cactus!

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    1. Indeed! And even if you do, pet them with care for they can leave spines on your skin too! :)

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  12. The humid tropical section is beautiful and I am also a fan of Opuntia macrodasys. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to you!

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  13. Hi Guys, wishing you a wonderful Christmas full of gorgeous food, great company and lots of laughter. All the best for 2013 and the big unveil of the pond in springtime. Merry Christmas! Paul

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  14. The photos are fabulous! I've never seen anything like that Sulcorebutia steinbachii var. gracilior! I want one! haha :) I hope you both have a very Merry Christmas!

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  15. Opuntia microdasys, just looks fantastic,shame about those horrible glochids when ever you touch them. I frequently curse my cactus plants but I really love them!

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    1. Thanks Roger! Glochids, now that was the word that escaped my mind whilst writing this post. Will try not to forget it again :)

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  16. What a wonderful place! Thanks for the great photos and tour! Merry Christmas my friend!

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    1. And Merry Christmas to you too Candy :)

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