Friday, March 08, 2013

Escape in the Jungle at Singapore Botanic Gardens

In previous blog posts we have featured the Ginger Garden and Bromeliads at Singapore Botanic Gardens, this time we explore the lush jungle planting. These photos are from within the Orchid Garden section, although there was a lot more than just orchids. In due course we shall share the orchids but today it's another turn for the lush, tropical planting.

The Orchid Garden was an absolute delight, and the planting and landscaping exceeded what we had anticipated. Not just orchids, but ferns, tree ferns, palms and a whole host of leafy tropical planting.

Whilst in Singapore we generally had some rain most days, which typically fell in the middle of the day. So whilst in the Orchid Garden the rain did once again make an appearance. Fortunately it didn't detract from enjoying a beautiful garden.

Water droplets on a Colocasia leaf
In many respects the rain enhanced the garden, making it more atmospheric, there were also not many visitors at the same time as us which always helps make a visit more enjoyable.





With the warmth, moisture and lack of winter everything looks so lush, the Cyatheas thrusting up from the undergrowth is a fabulous way to line a pathway. 


Large Aspleniums were everywhere, on the ground, on the trees, clinging to walls and rock faces.
I must look for more hardy forms for us to grow.

Blechnums are another group of ferns I really like!



Delightful forest pathways, and just us to enjoy. This lushness is something I'd like to work on in our
own garden this year.

Twisted roots as a feature, simply delightful. Whether it remains bare from plant life in the ideal
conditions of Singapore will remain to be seen.

We spotted this chap in the middle of things. He reminded me of the metal animals we have seen at
places such as Akamba here in the UK.



Gradually the epiphytes seem to take over all available branch or log.


Given a little time the log above will presumably look like these trees, with the branches covered in wonderful epiphytic life.

How's that for total immersion into plant life!


Singapore has a reputation for having signs forbidding almost everything, however we did not really notice too many. These signs above made me smile as they just seem so sweet and simple, although it doesn't say perhaps you are OK to walk on the garden as long as you have your safety boots on, only bare feet are banned! Or maybe not :)

Around every corner was another beautiful view. We are fans of water features and falls (I'm sure you may have guessed from our pond project!), this one works so well. With the water cascading down into a small pool. 



Philodendron in front of the waterfall
Looking back at our photos when composing this, it feels like our trip was such a long time ago already. However it gives me so many ideas and thoughts for our own garden; working out how to recreate some of the feel and atmosphere of the Singapore Gardens, and thinking through the plants that will give the look and be hardy. 

Gaz

19 comments:

  1. Fantastic photos. Those pathways are really lovely and some incredible plants in there.
    Cher Sunray Gardens

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    1. Glad you enjoyed the pictures Cher, there are some fantastic plants

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  2. Wonderful pictures - I wish mine had been as good! I am not a big fan of the twisted-root sculptures but the plantings really are just gorgeous.

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    1. Thanks CG its a fantastic garden

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  3. I must (respectfully) take issue with this comment "This lushness is something I'd like to work on in our own garden this year"...if you guys garden isn't lush then I don't know what is!

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    1. I guess we spot the less lush spaces more than visitors! Always room for more plants, We want to introduce more layering and ground cover in place.

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  4. I love that giant Aspenium. I bought a few Asplenium scolopendrium (Cristatum group) from Fibrex nursery and love their crinkly vibrant lush (and hardy) leaves.

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    1. Just looked that one up, its a beauty!

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  5. I agree with danger garden - that's exactly what crossed my mind - your garden is already lush and full and beautiful! Love the giraffe mixed in with the plants - perhaps that's what your garden needs! :)

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    1. We do have a small metal giraffe :) perhaps he should make an appearance on a future post.

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  6. What beautiful planting, you must be buzzing with ideas. It served to remind me that i really must get some good ferns. And ginger. I have fallen in love with ginger as ground cover...

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    1. Lots of ideas, although more from a design point of view than planting, anything we plant needs to take winter!

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  7. Loree and Holley are right, your garden is very lush. I was just thinking today as I cut down some 15 foot ornamental grasses that I'd like my garden to be as lush as yours is year round. Of course, digging out huge established grasses to plant palms will take some time but one of these days I'll get to it!

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    1. Its amazing how fast palms will grow once they get started.

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  8. Gorgeous. I'm very jealous. Can't think of many nicer past-times than wondering about botanical gardens - especially tropical ones. I'll try and remember to wear shoes though. Dave

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    1. Yes, no bare footed gardening David :D

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  9. Mark and Gaz
    I would like to see these Super Trees - trying to work out in my mind's eye whether they would horrify or delight.

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    1. The Supertrees are good fun, although and we really did like them. We can often be a little cynical on anything that is a bit too "arty" but they really were enjoyable up close - they are at Gardens By the Bay, rather than the botanic garden though.

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  10. Love the statues, always wanted to go to Singapore Botanic Gardens. Olive Mellor a designer in Australia (1930s to 1960s) brother was Director there during the Japanese occupation. Olive an Englis lass, was the first female student at Burnley Horticultural College, which is where I trained.

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