Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Three Climate Greenhouse

On the final instalment of our feature on Hortus Botanicus in Amsterdam we'll be sharing photos of our walk through their most interesting greenhouse attraction - the Three Climate Greenhouse.


When I first started preparing to blog about this greenhouse my initial idea was to divide it into three individual posts. But then again it might be over stretching a topic a bit too much hence now only one post. As the name suggests the greenhouse is divided into three climactic zones: temperate, tropical, and arid.


As you enter the greenhouse from the outside straight into the temperate zone you won't be able to help but notice this Phoenix palm by the entrance. It's pushing itself out and even more impressive is that it seems to be fine despite being out in the elements facing colder Amsterdam winters, with a large chunk of its roots exposed too. Being in a sheltered city centre location with a warm greenhouse adjacent to it must greatly help.



And now we explore the Temperate Zone...





How fun! A suspension walkway through the canopy of this zone.

Cussonia paniculata



Gorgeous! Cussonia spicata on steroids
And now into the Tropical Zone...

Lush!





Photoshoot ongoing whilst we were there


And finally my favourite of the three, the Arid Zone...


If you still must, a handsome Agave americana


Look at all that wasted vertical space on this bed!
This section, much better!
Conceptual art installation in the greenhouse




And that concludes our tour of the Three Climate Greenhouse and Hortus Botanicus in Amsterdam!

Mark :-)

27 comments :

  1. Thanks for the tour! I love these areas of conservatories because they don't have the huge bugs, snakes, and other dangerous critters that are present in the real places where the plants grow!.

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    1. That's so true Peter! Occasionally you do get some 'trapped' birds on it with their chirping rather nice to hear :)

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  2. I'm left a little disappointed. I think they need a funding campaign to fill the empty spaces!

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    1. It seems it's not very well funded Kris. But at least their structures seems in fine order at least.

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  3. Your garden needs that Palm thing with red stalks ;-)

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    1. If only Celia :) too tropical a plant I'm afraid

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  4. I'm with Celia, those red stalks are crazy, pity too tropical for you, would look amazing against the pergola... Funding must be an issue, lots if bare patches, but my favourite area is the arid, despite the lack of height in places. Those agaves...

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    1. Those agaves are gorgeous aren't Janet? I suppose we're spoilt with both Kew and Wisley here but I suppose other botanic gardens in the continent aren't being funded as well.

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  5. Thanks for the tour! I love to see what happens to the sub tropical stuff when it is in its favoured conditions, and you can see it attain full size. darn our pesky winters!!

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    1. Indeed :) Although it was also rather odd to see Trachycarpus fortunei growing under glass but I suppose those specimens have been in there for a long time before its hardiness has been established.

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  6. Looks like another place to add to the bucket list!!!!!

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    1. Indeed, and it's not that far either :)

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  7. I love greenhouses and this one is beautiful too. Thanks for the interesting tour!!

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  8. While one could easily pick out all the shortcomings at least they've got a nice greenhouse for the public to visit, that's more than we've got here in Portland! Thanks for the tour, the arid house would be my favorite too!

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    1. That's true Loree, and as a bonus it's in the city centre too unlike most botanic gardens which are on the outskirts.

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  9. Timely reminder to repot my Cussonia spicata. Very nice, but I'd love to see a greenhouse where you two are guest curators ;)

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    1. If we are it'll be rammed full of plants Denise :)

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  10. That is so awesome!! What a haven that would be to visit in winter. I must say, I love the lush temperate and tropical zones more, but the arid zone is very cool!

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    1. These glasshouses are at their element in the winter Indie, a source of green fix during the colder months.

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  11. The red stems on that palm caught my eye, too, as well as the Cussonia spicata. You can definitely see some neglect due to poor funding, but it's still wonderful to have a place like this to visit, especially in winter.

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  12. This greenhouse looks better maintained than the first two you visited at least. Lots of interesting plants here. A great shame about the funding, but a sign of the times I suppose.

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  13. Well, they are trying. That's something. The greenhouse itself is quite nice. The tropical area looks best, the arid--well, kind of amazing they have anything desert that actually survives in grey damp cold Amsterdam, so they are doing pretty good.

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  14. Interesting greenhouse! It is fun to see the same lowly tools we all have at home!

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  15. What a great greenhouse! That palm with the bright red trunk looked interesting.

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  16. Hey Mark and Gaz, how are you doing? I'm now back into the blog and garden world after a long hiatus. It's great to visit your blog again. I like that art-corner they have made except that blue towel (or piece of cloth). I also agree with you regarding the wastage of all those vertical spaces.

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  17. Have you blogged about this before? Or someone else? Seem to recognize some photos. Looks like a great place I would like to see in person.

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