Tuesday, October 16, 2012

The Garden in October

Such a sunny Sunday it was. Saturday wasn't so sunny, but decent enough that we were able to finish the pathway (more on that later). But last Sunday was glorious here, not bad considering it is the middle of October already.
In the jungle...

Ginkgo biloba 'Mariken' with lovely autumn colour
Rhus typhina turning scarlet for autumn

You could barely see the chimenea now as it's swamped by Tinantia pringlei
Several areas reported having moderate to heavy frost the night before. Fortunately we were spared, which bought us time as we haven't really brought many plants under cover just yet. Almost none actually. But we have been doing regular sweeping as the leaves from deciduous plants have started to fall as one would expect during autumn.



A lush clump of Hedychiums, which one, I can't remember and won't know until the flowers have opened!
The reliable Dahlia 'Twyning's After Eight'
A mall selection of Rex Begonias
Come to think of it, apart from one or two plants that are truly tender, there aren't really many that we have to bring under cover just yet. Even if the threat of frosts are imminent. As long as the daytime temperatures are still well above freezing during the day, and frosts are still few and far in between, most of the not so hardy plants will be fine and might as well stay out for as long as possible (and feasible).


One of our resident jungle trawlers, Twinkles



But neither of us would want a mad rush either, so with the sunny Sunday we have officially started the big pots migration, starting with the succulents (they need to dry out). The rest will follow gradually in the next few days and weeks.

Pot migration however was not the highlight of the sunny Sunday. It was the general time we have spent in the garden, gardening. Good old fashioned gardening: planting out a few more plants, pruning, pottering, you name it. And we both felt that, instead of it feeling like autumn, it felt like spring.





Tetrapanax papyrifer 'rex'

Elatostema rugosum
The weather was fine yet there is a nip in the air, and if you ignore the dates then you could almost feel that it's spring. How I wish that was the case! But for now we're content with the one day feeling of spring.

Another reason we felt 'spring like' is that this is the first time in ages that we have done good old fashioned gardening, no projects, just pure plants and gardening. And it was almost like we were doing some catching up, tidying plants today that are usually done four months ago, held back as we concentrated on the project. But this time we finally had the time to do it, long overdue yes but very satisfying.

No signs of autumn yet for the lovely Magnolia macrophylla subsp. Ashei (left)





Saxifraga longifolia (if only I spotted that tiny bit of slate right in the middle...)
Overall, a very rewarding and productive weekend. And we had time to take photos of the garden too!

The Garden in October - thanks for joining us on a virtual tour of our garden, one fine autumnal Sunday, and we hope you enjoyed it!
Mark :-)

29 comments:

  1. What an oasis of tranquility you have! I thoroughly enjoyed the video tour. It truly looks like a naturally evolved environment instead of a garden planted by humans. I also love all the decorations and pieces of art cleverly tucked away here and there. A beautiful balance.

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    1. Hi Gerhard, thank you so much for your kind comments, glad you enjoyed the tour. We always intend to make more videos but somehow never quite get round to it. Perhaps that should be our new years resolution to make more!

      We have tried to let the decorations blend into the garden rather than be too prominent, glad you appreciated them.

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  2. I tend to zero in on plants I can't grow, like that gorgeous saxifrage, but it's all just magical. Hope you get a few more weeks to enjoy it!

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    1. Hi Denise, I think we all do that to some extent, always pushing the boundaries and limits on what we can grow. Hopefully the weather will be kind running into November.

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  3. The Ginkgo color is gorgeous. Love the Dahlia and the foliage is lovely. That was a heck of an exotic tour. Really enjoyed it. Twinkles is too cute.
    Cher

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    1. Hi Cher, we love the colour Ginkgos show at this time of year, the weather has been just right for a good show. Glad you enjoyed the tour! And we have to agree Twinkles is cute!! :)

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  4. First, I have to say I think that dahlia is amazing! Now - how wonderful to have a day of gardening that feels like spring, even though it's October! I loved your virtual tour, and going through your jungle of beauty. Your garden must be a fun place to walk through in real life.

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    1. Thanks Holley, we do enjoy spending time walking through the garden, and at this time of year with the autumn colour theres plenty of change to see every day.

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  5. Thanks for the walk through tour. It really does look like a tropical paradise.

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    1. Thanks so much for the lovely comments Missy

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  6. I tend to refuse to believe that you live in England and not some tropical paradise. This post reenforces that belief.

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  7. Nicely done ! A few dozen fuchsias would have brought me right back to my LA childhood.

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    1. Hiya KS, I dont think we have any fuchsias in the garden at present, maybe will try a few next year. Glad you enjoyed seeing the garden.

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  8. The autumnal colour of your Gingko is stunning. A wonderful garden tour on this drizzly Wednesday morn.

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    1. Gingko have such lovely autumn colour! Glad you enjoyed the tour round. We will try and be a bit more frequent in preparing little viedos.

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  9. Looking fabulous.....does winter really have to come?

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    1. Thanks Clive, i know how you feel, lets keep autumn until spring please!

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  10. I always love your video tours and would love to see where & how your new koi pond fits with the rest of your amazingly beautiful garden. You've incorporated a lot of wonderful evergreen foliage so that your garden will still be interesting in winter!

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    1. Thanks, glad you enjoy the tour. We have been keen to ensure the garden looks good in winter as well as summer, hence the evergreen plants you spotted. One of the risks to a tropical garden in the UK is often there can be too many covers and plant protection in place in winter that can detract from the look of the garden. On a pleasant winter or early spring day we want to enjoy the garden. Of course there are many more tender plants, but these are kept in pots so that they can be moved in winter rather than being protected in place. I must try and remember to do a follow up in the middle of winter to show the garden in say January.

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  11. Loved the tour! It was almost like being back in your garden again. Of course I enjoyed the Schefflera waiving at me (what? that was just the wind?) and the noise of your footsteps and the rustling leaves was perfect.

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    1. Hi Loree glad you enjoyed it, and yes we asked (very nicely) the Schefflera to wave. Don't you train your plants to follow commands too?

      For some reason I mis-read your name on the post and thought it was someone else.. so I was like "when did you visit!!", slightly mad moment :)

      Looking forward to seeing some of your pics, as its always nice to see the garden though someone elses view point.

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  12. What a fabulous video tour, your garden looks huge! Testament to the very clever planting - I love the way you have used large plants to direct the flow around the garden, it's a true natural paradise. Bravo!

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    1. Thanks Martin, glad you enjoyed the tour.

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  13. I agree with Martin. Always amazed at how huge your garden looks. Job well done. I remember After Eight from last year ... a real stunner. Dave

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    1. Hi David, After Eight is hardy and keeps going until the frosts, a great plant well worth adding to any style of garden.

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  14. Mark and Gaz, what happens to those big plants on the ground when winter comes! I feel bad for them.

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    1. Hi Andrea, The large plants in the ground have been chosen to be hardy in our location, whilst some will not like the colder periods, they will go dormant and wait until spring to continue. We do try some more experimental plants and have to hope the winter is not too bad, these are placed in more sheltered positions to give them the best chance. The more tender plants are kept in pots so can be moved.

      The key is using plants that look for more exotic and tropical than they are, for instance palms such as trachycarpus have no problems for us. Using hardy plants that look exotic combined with more tropical plants in pots gives us the exotic look of the garden.

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  15. this is a fabulous garden l just discover it today on danger garden blog.
    i will folow now all your new post.

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