Wednesday, July 04, 2018

Post Mortem Embrace

As I was tidying and removing some of the dead plants still dotted around the garden last weekend I noticed this in our utility area (i.e. where some dead plants are also stored to be sorted out later):




It's like the long dead Cyathea australis giving the newly dead Yucca thompsoniana a cuddle,  a post mortem embrace. Perhaps it is giving it commiseration or a welcome to plant hades.

The Yucca came to us many years ago bare root and needing TLC so it stayed in the greenhouse for quite some time. Not long after being repotted it flowered which took up a lot of energy from an already ailing plant. And instead of re-rooting, all pre existing roots that it had rotted away instead. It was a slow death for the poor plant as it lingered in the greenhouse for years, finally succumbing this spring despite being given special care all through those times. Nevermind. And so the remaining trunk is now stashed with other architectural lifeless plant bodies in the utility area.

And speaking of demise after flowering, one of my favourite bamboos in the garden, a very slow growing one yet so beautiful with its bright yellow culms with green stripe on its sulcus is flowering...

Phyllostachys bambusoides 'Castillonis' 



Ouch! All culms of this Phyllostachys bambusoides 'Castillonis' are affected. Time will tell if it will be full or partially flowering, with the latter still giving hope that it will survive. If it's the former then this could be its swan song. Apart from the annoyance of losing a beautiful and cherished part of the garden, it'll be a pain too to remove the carcass. Fingers crossed the flowering will just set it back and will recover after this floral episode.

And another beloved plant that is currently flowering, this time in the conservatory...


Mangave 'Bloodspot'
I sort of knew that Mangave 'Bloodspot' is short lived and flowers early but I was hoping this won't be the case as we've only had this for a few years and grew from small. Well flowering is indeed the case now and soon after this plant will go to plant hades too. But apparently this plant fortunately sends out a lot of suckers after flowering so fingers crossed this one won't be an exception as I'd love to have several more of this.

A self replacing plant is not always appreciated but definitely for this one it will be!

Mark :-)

14 comments :

  1. Gardens change, whether we want them to or not! I hope the bamboos at least come through their current trial.

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    Replies
    1. Going through the evolution with it is part of the fun :)

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  2. Welcome to the "one of my favorite bamboos has flowered" club. Too bad all the members are grumpy, disappointed, and exhausted. :)

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  3. Castillon is blooming all over the world this year. I"m in Seattle and have seen several examples. Alas!

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    Replies
    1. Oh no! In a way I’m glad that ours is not the only one.

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  4. Bamboo is strictly for the bold gardener!

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    Replies
    1. Not quite but yes tread with caution..

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  5. Mine also flowered through the winter. Still a bit flowering now but it appears as if the new culms are ok. Fingers crossed. YK

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  6. That bamboo is beautiful. Hope it comes through for you.

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  7. Fingers crossed for 'Castillonis!.' Sure hope it's not the next addition to your carcass collection waiting for bring out your dead day.

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