Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Succulents Away!

Packing up plants for the winter is not something I look forward to, as it means summer is over and the colder months are lying ahead. The perk of it though is I get to inspect the plants more more closely than I would when they are actually out on display.


Only a small fraction of our succulents made it in the sun room as both of us don't want to clutter it too much. The rest of the house will remain almost plant free (we're not going in the 'jam as many plants indoors' direction ever again). I mentioned on a previous post that I may put plants in our lounge but I retract that now, best not to start in case such action will cascade into having more plants in the house.

Fortunately there are the two greenhouses where most of our not so hardy plants will be stored for the winter and packing it up has begun. Agaves and aloes are usually the first ones to go in so they get a chance to dry out before winter sets in.

The first batch are in:

Aloe cryptopoda
Agave salmiana angustifolia marginata
Agave montana - this one has thin variegated stripes only on one side of the plant
Agave titanota - stayed compact for a couple of years but this year the leaves have elongated
Agave guadalajarana
Agave victoria-reginae
Agave ghiesbreghtii
A few more succulents that may or may not stay in here for the winter. Some of them will need more warmth to sail through so will be relocated somewhere else, a new garden outbuilding that we are constructing at the moment (more on that later).



This coming weekend I'll be putting in more plants in this greenhouse and start sorting out the other one. We've established a routine now and although it looks like we have a huge amount of plants to move in it's not really as much as other enthusiasts do and not as tiring as it looks. It's quite relaxing in its own right actually.

Although I still much prefer moving them out.

Mark :-)

34 comments :

  1. I hope you are keeping all those pointy bits clear of the bubble wrap.. :)

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    1. I had to snip some of them off Jessica for that reason Jessica, plas I can Jen more of them in :)

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  2. Are you like me, in that at some point during this process you say "Why do I have so many non-hardy plants?"

    Another outbuilding. Have you ever posted a map of your garden? I can't visualize where everything fits... there's a huge koi pond, two greenhouses, a beautiful "shed" (I forgot what you call it), and you don't see any of these in most of the photos you post. Does not compute...

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    1. Tell me about it Alan, now is the time when I think why do I acquire so many non hardy plants. But they're so hard to resist...

      I think we've got a map somewhere in the blog. I'll see if I can find it then repost, if not I'm sure we can do one :)

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  3. I'm in the middle of the same process right now too, moving plants into the greenhouse and trying to figure out where everything will fit, and will I (hope not) have to bring something into the house? Or maybe give it up to winter's cold and wet? I'm also currently waiting for some new shelving to arrive. It's like trying to put together a jigsaw puzzle.

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    1. True Alison. Also I've found that snipping some of the terminal spines off the agaves I can fit more in the greenhouse. I would have preferred not to snip them but practicality warrants it this time.

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  4. The agaves are snuggled all warm in their beds...I wonder what visions dance in their heads...

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    1. Visions of summer I can imagine Ricki :)

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  5. I love having plants in the house, but when I get my own greenhouse I'm definitely going to be storing more of my tender plants there rather than cluttering the house. Some only have seasonal moments of beauty that merit their being indoors, others just don't grow as well indoors as they would in a greenhouse. I'm looking forward to when I can pare down the clutter to just a few stalwart houseplants with highlights rotated in as plants come into bloom or merit special display. Until then, and especially at the moment since I don't have space to plant anything in the ground, I'm packing as many plants into my flat as my little heart desires.

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    1. If space is a premium or very short Evan its fine to store plants in the house as long as it doesn't bother you. We did get to a point before that we brought in so many that it looked silly. And yes they don't always do well in the house with central heating and often gloomy conditions and actually do better in the greenhouse despite having lower temperatures.

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  6. I can't even imagine how I'd manage if I had to cart all my succulents in each fall. Yours all look in tip-top condition, though!

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    1. You're lucky with the winter weather in your location Kris :) our succulents certainly did seem to enjoy the summer they just had

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  7. Your last sentence made me smile. As I've been moving things under cover I've been thinking about the reverse move in the spring. While it's a happy time (summer ahead!) that move is also a little trickier as there's the need to protect things from too much sun and corresponding burn.

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    1. I thought of you whilst I was moving these plants Loree, especially after seeing how snug and organised your storage is in the pavilion and basement :) nothing is ever that simple isn't it?

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  8. We are in the opposite situation here in the Southern hemisphere - mid-Spring now. I am so enjoying the longer, warmer days. Your post has made me a little guilty though, as my succulents have been sadly neglected. I will definitely add repotting the aloes to my to-do list for the weekend.

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    1. Hi Marisa, at least you have the spring there and the coming summer to sort out your succulents, they will look good again in no time at all :)

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  9. Sounds like a huge task! Interesting that you don't like lots of plants in the house - I don't either, for me gardening is outdoors and greenhouses count as being outdoors!

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    1. Little doses of it indoors I don't mind Ingrid but we did go through a crazy stage for awhile of bringing in so many it became a jungle indoors too. Put us off in the end and now enjoying not having plants in most parts of the house :) agree, greenhouse counts as outdoor space really

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  10. What a great collection. I'm guilty of bringing too many plants indoors, although I have about half as many as I had last year. I still have to clean up and bring the bromeliads indoors. A big job I've been putting off. I don't mind it so much once I get started but it's the starting that's hard

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    1. That's alright Deanne, as long as it doesn't bother you and you enjoy it :)

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  11. I'm going to be doing the big migration into the new greenhouse on Saturday evening and Sunday afternoon! Although I don't like bringing the plants in for the same reasons as you, it will be a bit exciting this year because I'll have so much more space than usual. We'll see how quickly it fills up!

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    1. Your new garage to greenhouse conversion looks exciting Peter :)

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  12. Moving them all out is such a lovely, optimistic job, and, like you, I hate bringing them in as it marks the end of a gorgeous summer. You have such a fantastic variety of Agaves ! Fingers crossed for a winter where temperatures do not dip too low, so that all the tender stuff gets through to spring in good fettle !

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    1. It would be nice if we have another mild winter again Jane, much like the last one but perhaps less stormy

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  13. Ohh, so many great plants!!! But it looks like tough work...Oh no...I´m late to all your posts lately :(

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    1. Not to worry Lisa, with your fab stay in Peru I can understand :)

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  14. I think it must be quite nice to see them all grouped together and snug and safe in their winter quarters. I agree with not having too many plants indoors, it must be such a big difference for them, from light to shade, cold to hot. Anyway, who am I to talk, I always kill my houseplants!

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    1. We used to kill houseplants in the summer Caro as we were outside all the time :)

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  15. I imagine that autumnal preparations are quite a big job for you preferably done in dry weather. Another annual ritual which must leave you most satisfied once completed.

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    1. Definitely Anna, although we didn't do much of it last weekend either...

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  16. You are very fortunate to have two greenhouses to hold your superb collection. It would take me forever to get them put away; I would spend too much time admiring them!

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    1. It's not too bad Debs especially we have a routine in place already :)

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  17. Hah! bet you eventually wind up cramming plants into the lounge as well... The succulents all look very happy in the snuggly wrapped winter home. I've still not brought my pelargoniums in, though in fairness it is still ridiculously mild.

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  18. Wonderful collection. Hope they all make it through the cold months. Mine are in the house so I keep an eye on them.

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