Sunday, October 14, 2012

Yew Turn Me On

Last year we spent an afternoon cutting back a large Yew tree (Taxus baccata) that was on the boundary between the old garden and the newer koi pond area. Its one of the few plants that predates us in the garden but was quite a sprawling shape.  We wanted to tidy up the shape and let more light into the garden.


Some of the branches we took off were quite thick, upto 7 or 8 inches across, and before we had chance to chop them up into smaller sections our neighbour asked if he could have them. If someone wants your garden waste then it saves a trip to the tip, so we were only too glad to pass them over the fence. Roy explained to us that he wanted the wood so that he could turn it on a lathe. He teaches wood turning at a local club so we were only too happy to oblige.



Well this morning we were chatting over the garden fence and Roy mentioned that he had used some of that wood already, and went off to show us what he had made. He kindly gave some of the items to us, so the wood from that old tree will live on!


Comparing the goblet to the source.

We will have to save any other wood we cut to pass over the fence from now on!

Gaz

26 comments :

  1. You are lucky to have such a wonderful neighbor!

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    1. Hi Masha, they are lovely neighbours, as well as making us these nice things, they have been very supportive during our pond project.

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  2. WoW!!! Beautiful! Who knows, one day you might want to take private lessons and learn how to do it yourselves! I knew one person from Georgia (former Soviet republic) who used to make goblets from wood, with walls as thin as glass! Your pictures reminded me of him.
    I have two yews growing in the pots. I hope they'll never grow so thick!

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    1. Hi Tatyana, he has invited us to have a go, so maybe we will try some time. Your friend sounds very talented, that must be hard to make such thin walls. Yew in pots would not be too good if it was 8" thick!

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  3. Wow! I am jealous. We have big cedars on our property, but no neighbor to turn them into works of art. Like you, Roy is very talented.

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    1. Hi Debs, can you imagine if you have a sculptor near you that can turn those big cedars into large works of art? They'll look great in your garden :)

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  4. How splendid to have these very local, non mass produced and unique objects from your own garden.

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    1. Hi ks, that's what makes these little objects extra special, not only are they unique but they are also partially a product of our garden (Roy's handiwork will be the other half) :)

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  5. how wonderful, to be saved a trip to the trip AND to see the wood transformed into such beautiful artefacts.

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    1. Hi catmint, only the bigger parts were of use, the smaller bits and foliage still had to be taken to the tip. But it was nice to see the bigger bits transformed :)

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  6. How lucky are you! That's a fabulous gift, your debris returned to you in such beautiful form.

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    1. They were lovely gifts indeed Loree, and a surprise too!

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  7. What a great neighbour to have and what a wonderful use of natural materials.

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    1. They are lovely neighbours indeed, very supportive as well!

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  8. Roy is a clever guy - I guess he has made a Yew turn....

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    1. Clever and wood crafty he is Martin!

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  9. Love it, so much better than burning it.

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  10. Oh what a brilliant example of recycling - you must have been delighted with your gift.

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    1. Hi Anna, yes we were, and was a pleasant surprise too!

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  11. Well I'm sure you were delighted with what came back over the fence again guys. Beautiful craftsmanship - and a great neighbour too.

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    1. Hi Rosie, we were so pleased to receive these, and somehow it makes it extra special that they came from wood from our own tree.

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  12. Wow! That is amazing, and those are lovely! Such talent - and what a wonderful use of your tree trimmings!

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  13. Hi Holley, quite a nice and unique way of recycling your tree trimmings :)

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