Tuesday, July 01, 2014

An English Deviation

We were on our way to a garden centre last Sunday when we spontaneously decided to deviate away fro  our intended route and go to a nearby English Heritage property instead which is Wrest Park.



Now this is not the usual sort of garden or attraction we go to nor gets featured in our blog but the interest in heritage properties and landscape is there (it's just that we don't talk about it that often) so it wasn't that hard to make such a spontaneous decision. And on top of that we signed up to become members too, deciding right then and there. Which means we must make an effort to visit more English Heritage sites to make the annual membership fee we paid worthwhile. Which means more period and historical properties will probably make its way to our blog over the next year or so (maybe...).




Wrest Park is a country estate with a grade 1 country house and a sprawling grounds with formal gardens and outbuildings, some of which were constructed during the Baroque period, reflecting the style distinct of that era.



As much as I enjoyed our visit I wasn't feeling inspired to take lots of photos, instead just content exploring the place without being snap happy. So excuse my not so symmetrical photos but it will give you ideas what the property looks like.







They do however have a small glasshouse that gave a little flavour of the exotic to our visit.


Musa basjoo 
Dahlia imperialis
They need to update their labels! (Cordyline australis)



It was interesting to see that a lot of the plants there can actually grow outside all year round at least in the southern part of the UK. Although the planting inside were well maintained its not really a serious sort of glasshouse with a discerning collection of exotica but rather just to demonstrate the function and intent of the structure. Still it was nice to see and made me think...


I loved this one!
Cercis siliquastrum - Judas Tree trained on a wall and has large leaves
I may not even fathom to start desiring a manor home but I can certainly desire a glasshouse as big as that, if not bigger.

Who knows...

Mark :-)

20 comments :

  1. I will never speak to you two again if you start doing those summer bedding themes :-) I, too, enjoy visits to stately homes but those of the same period do tend to have a very predictable theme. I would have thought Maharajahs palaces would be more to your taste :-)

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    1. Definitely not going in that direction Don :) Funny you mentioned about the predictable theme as that was one of the things we talked about whilst there, how stately homes and their grounds tend to look the same. To see Maharajah palaces would be great, an onus to go on an exotic vacation!

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  2. So I followed the link and then another link and so on until I decided it was time to return and comment on what a fascinating journey it will be. From early ruins to Cold War bunkers the list of diversions is extensive and what a wonderful thing they are doing to link these properties together for restoring and preserving them.

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    1. These historical properties are fascinating to explore isn't it Shirley? :) It seems that the English Heritage and National Trust are doing a great job maintaining these historical properties for everyone to enjoy now and in the future.

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  3. For those of us who come from areas in which anything with a history of 20 years or more is considered "old," these forays into places with more interesting and extensive pasts are very interesting.

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    1. One of the main draws of the UK and the rest of the old continent is its rich history and heritage Kris, and I'm glad a lot of these historical properties are being preserved and seemingly on safe hands.

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  4. A beautiful home! You really should have a conservatory that size!

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  5. The second photo made me laugh. They're gripping their heads because they hurt, it's hard work having so much money and having to figure out how to spend it all..

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    1. Now I wonder what was the thinking behind the design of those sculptures Loree, hmmm...

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  6. England really does do a stately home well. We have nothing like it here.

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    1. Lots of relics of the past here Missy :)

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  7. That is the beauty of England and America, they have lots of gardens and heritage sites like those, well protected, maintained and loved. That's a very wide area, which if here will feed a lot of people already!

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    1. That's something I appreciate here Andrea, that there are loads of well preserved and maintained historical properties to enjoy now.

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  8. Hello Mark and Gaz,

    We have had much fun and interest in our time from visiting both National Trust and English Heritage sites. And, latterly we rather favoured the English Heritage properties as they were less well known, not so crowded and, although well maintained, not overly restored. We are pleased that you joined up as members since all these institutions require funds to keep going and they do sterling work in preserving the Nation's historical heritage.

    If you get chance, do visit Belsay Hall in Northumberland. Less house and more garden and what an adventure!

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    1. Hi Jane and Lance, interesting to know your thoughts about the English Heritage and National Trust, the difference between the two was a topic of our conversation whilst we were there. Now that you've said it, come to think of it yes, EH properties seems less well known but just as delightful.

      Belsay Hall, another one to add to the list!

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  9. What a lovely place to visit. The architecture is spectacular and worth the visit just for that. The gardens are sure kept tidy which is a must for formal gardens. Lovely!
    Cher Sunray Gardens

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    1. The maintenance of the grounds were impeccable Cher, and the views were amazing. To have all that land, wow!

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  10. I just love all your beautiful heritage estates. So many glorious structures from a bygone era. I have always loved classical architecture and sculpture. I have a few urns and things scattered throughout my gardens even though the landscape doesn't really lend itself to that. Too many rustic rock walls and cottagey type plantings. But, it's my garden after all and the only person I have to please is myself, LOL.. Eclectic is good, right? Looking forward to your next visit of a heritage site. TFS

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    1. We love your garden Deanne! It is beautiful and your individual character shows through with how you planted and arranged things. Eclectic is good and why not! :)

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