Saturday, June 26, 2021

Cordyline Australis

 A staple "exotic" plant, and one that we use fairly sparingly in the garden. With a selection of common names such as Cabbage palm or Torbay palm making reference to the word palm, it is often confused as such. 

Hailing from New Zealand, and pretty hardy in most of the UK, in all but the harshest of winters they are a fairly common sight.

One of ours is in flower at the moment and the sweet heady scent fills the air by the koi pond. People often say they smell like cat pee, so I'm rather pleased we don't seem to get that scent. Regardless of how they smell, the bees appear to love it at the moment.

Cordyline australis in bloom

Cordyline australis in bloom

Cordyline australis in bloom

Cordyline australis in bloom

How do you find the scent, heavenly or cat pee?

Gaz




10 comments :

  1. Mine keep getting knocked back by cold before they can get big enough to bloom. I see them blooming in the Seattle area but haven't gotten close enough to smell.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's curious. It's a strong scent and gets mixed reactions

      Delete
  2. They grow all over Astoria, Oregon, especially on the sunny south slope of the city. I love to see them in bloom. I often wonder how so many came to be planted there originally. I have added a cultivar to my garden there, and it appears happy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Curious how it's become a staple here especially coastal locations. Likely that it sets seed here easily. It's great that it does well along Astoria, a great plant for exposed, seaside locations

      Delete
  3. There were masses of them in Weymouth, when I lived there, and I always thought the flowers looked a bit daft - a bit like Christmas trees thrown by vandals onto the Cordylines at random angles. I moved house with one grown from the seeds of one of the flowers but it's suffering from being in a pot, even though it's the largest I can manage, and is raising itself up on its roots.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sounds like aerial roots, should do better planted out. Have found that it's one of the plants that tolerate pot culture very well though.

      Delete
  4. The shrubbier version of a Cordyline I have has a delicate sweet fragrance to its flowers.

    Could it be possible the ones that smell like cat pee are in gardens well populated with...cats?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Could be :) have found it depends who smells them as well, genetic thing going on...

      Delete

Thank you for taking the time to reply to our post, we love reading comments and hearing your views.

Due to the increased level of spam, please note comments on older posts are moderated and only published after approval. All new comments are read and any spam is deleted.